A study suggests that the whiff of tears lessens male aggression

 A study suggests that the whiff of tears lessens male aggression

A study suggests that the whiff of tears lessens male aggression

A new study published in PLOS Biology, a US science journal, has found that human tears contain a chemical signal that reduces brain activity linked to male aggression.

The research was carried out by the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. The study involved 25 male volunteers who were exposed to either “emotional” tears, or to saline. The volunteers couldn’t tell what they were sniffing as both substances were clear and odorless.

The tears obtained from six female volunteers who watched sad films in isolation and used a mirror to capture the liquid in a vial as it trickled down their cheeks.

The volunteers then played a computer game that had well-established in prior aggression studies and involved accumulating money while a fictitious opponent could steal their earnings. Given the opportunity, the men could get revenge on the other player by causing them to lose money, even though in their case they would not gain from the opponent’s loss.

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Such revenge-seeking, aggressive behavior in the game dropped 43.7% after men sniffed the tears.

The researchers believe that the chemical signal in tears detected by olfactory receptors in the nose. They found that four receptors activated by tears, but not saline.

The scientists also repeated the experiments with the men’s brains connected to MRI scanners. The imaging revealed the prefrontal cortex and anterior insula, which are related to aggression, became more active when men provoked during the game, but the effect was not as strong if they had sniffed tears.

The authors of the study say that their findings could have implications for the treatment of aggression in humans. They suggest that tear-based therapies could developed to help reduce aggression in people with conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder and psychopathy.

The study is the latest in a growing body of research that suggests that tears are more than just a way of expressing sadness. They may also play a role in social bonding and conflict resolution.

This study is a fascinating one that suggests that tears may have more than just an emotional function. They may also play a role in reducing male aggression. This could have implications for the treatment of aggression in humans, especially male aggression. More research needed to confirm these findings, but they are certainly intriguing.

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